CSB Must Force Disclosure Of Chemical Emissions From Accidents

Feb. 12, 2019
Judge orders the Chemical Safety Board and Hazard Investigation Board to force companies to disclose chemical emissions resulting from accidents.

A federal judge orders the Chemical Safety Board (CSB) and Hazard Investigation Board to force companies to disclose chemical emissions resulting from accidents, according to an article from The Washington Post. The ruling comes as the result of a lawsuit filed by Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility and other nonprofit environmental groups following Hurricane Harvey.

The Clean Air Act requires the CSB to investigate accidents such as fires and explosions, yet the agency has put no regulations in place that require disclosure, says Judge Amit Mehta of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. According to the article, Mehta gave the agency 12 months to come up with a final disclosure regulation, noting that it has had more than 20 years to do so.

Read the entire article here.

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