Environmental, Health & Safety

on 'Environmental Health & Safety'

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  • The Green Solution

    The ever present emphasis on technological efficiency is just one of several forces behind the pressure on companies to "go green" despite a trying economy. The ultimate criterion that determines whether a motor is truly green is energy efficiency. Technology, long the key to efficiency, can help resolve this issue.

    PdMA Corp.
    03/08/2010
  • The Regional Transport of Ozone

    EPA tracks emissions of six principal air pollutants - carbon monoxide, lead, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds. All have decreased significantly since passage of the Clean Air Act in 1970 - except for nitrogen oxides.

    EPA
    01/31/2006
  • Understand the hazards of flammable liquid spills

    This short paper discusses the risks of flash fires and pool fires from spills of flammable liquids, preventative measures, as well as how to avoid hazards during the clean up of such spills.

    Chilworth Technology
    12/09/2004
  • Understanding Dust Explosion Dangers

    The unfortunate propensity of dust explosions to destroy entire facilities and claim lives is very real. Powder handling processes often are comprised of interconnected enclosures and equipment. Flame and pressure resulting from a dust explosion can therefore propagate through piping, across galleries, and reach other pieces of equipment or enclosures, leading to extensive damage. In this Chemical Processing Special Report, we take a look at the latest NFPA standards and dust explosion mitigation strategies. This Special Report covers:
     

    • Significant revisions to dust explosion standards – NFPA 654 major changes include new administrative requirements
    • How to defuse dust dangers - carefully consider and then counter risks of fire and explosion
    • Five common dust explosion misconceptions that can lead to a false sense of security

    Prepare your facility against potential dust explosion dangers. Download your copy of this Chemical Processing Special Report now.

    12/17/2013
  • Understanding Regulated Health and Safety Standards--Part 1

    This paper provides the viewpoint of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), a private not-for-profit, non-governmental corporation open to all industrial hygienists or other occupational health and safety professionals. The authors have the opinion that there are misunderstandings about the use of regulated health and safety standards. In part one of this article, they provide some information on how regulations are formed and advice on using these values to conduct business. Employers and employees need this fundamental understanding to make informed health and safety decisions. This information is also useful for guiding public decisions about everyday toxic exposures.

    10/22/2004
  • White Paper: Understanding the Risks Associated with FIBCs and Electrostatic Hazards

    Flexible Intermediate Bulk Containers (FIBCs) have found their niche in the worldwide transportation of powdered, flaked and granulated products. FIBCs are typically made of woven plastic with some type of liner insert and are often referred to as super sacks, big bags or bulk bags in industry. During filling and emptying of FIBCs there is a steady accumulation of static charge that can result in electrostatic discharges from the FIBC. This may in turn provide sufficient energy for ignition of combustible particulate solids or flammable vapors, not to mention unsettling shocks to nearby personnel. In this white paper we review the NFPA 654 Standard for the Prevention of Fire and Dust Explosions from Combustible Particulate Solids and the importance of why identifying the Minimum Ignition Energy (MIE) of your combustible dust or flammable vapor is a necessary component for selecting the correct FIBC Type for your application. Download now.

    Fauske & Associates
    10/22/2012
  • Why Process Safety Management Audits Fail

    Most companies have completed at least three process safety management(PSM) compliance audits of their covered facilities since the promulgation of the OSHA PSM standard. These companies, however, are not seeing noticeable improvements in their PSM programs. In fact, many companies feel that their PSM programs have become less effective. What has happened and why? Are there any lessons learned from the Enron collapse and its auditing program? What needs to be done?

    ioMosaic
    10/22/2004
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