Organizations Unite At Future of U.S. Chemicals Policy Conference

Organizations representing chemical manufacturers, environmental and public health advocates, environmental justice leaders and consumer product goods companies came together at a Future of U.S. Chemicals Policy conference to explore fundamental changes to the current federal chemical management policies.

Speaking at a panel on Chemicals Policy for the 21st Century, American Chemistry Council (ACC) President and CEO, Cal Dooley, stated: “This truly is a historic event and we are encouraged to see the EPA, environmental groups and consumer companies come together to discuss a law that is central to one of the most important issues Americans are faced with today; the safety of the products we use to make our lives better, safer and healthier.

“Our highest priority is public health and safety and Americans deserve to have confidence that the products they buy are safe for the uses for which they were designed.  Chemical products are fundamental to our modern way of life, from the clothes we wear to the medicines that keep us healthy. Yet, the primary current federal chemical law is more than 30 years old.  We want to harness the advances made in science and technology to develop a comprehensive chemical management law that protects the health and safety of the Americans, while promoting the innovation that will lead to the development of essential new chemical products and new high-paying jobs. 

The Future of U.S. Chemicals Policy conference was sponsored by the Environmental Working Group, Rachel’s Network, The Pew Health Group, Community Against Pollution, The Louisiana Bucket Brigade, American Chemistry Council, Grocery Manufacturers Association, Turner Foundation, Soap and Detergent Association, and Consumer Specialty Products Association.

For more information, visit:  www.americanchemistry.com.

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