From your question I am going to assume you are referring to attack of an austenitic stainless steel by an aqueous stream with chlorides. Unfortunately, I don't know much about the use of corrosion inhibitors for austenitic stainless steels. It is important to keep in mind that inhibitors can make corrosion worse if not used in sufficient concentrations. They can prevent general/uniform corrosion but are limited in their ability to prevent localized corrosion such as pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking. Since these forms of localized attack of austenitic stainless steels are commonly induced by chlorides, I am not sure how successful this approach might be. You might be better off choosing a material of construction that is more resistant to chloride attack. If you want to pursue the use of a corrosion inhibitor for your application, I suggest you get input from a reputable water-treatment firm or an independent consultant with expertise in this area.