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  • Loggers Keep Feeding Data-Hungry Users

    Recorders and DAQs Have Survived the Advent of PCs, Adapted to Cooperate with Software-Based Historians and Continue to Serve in Applications Where Computers Can't Go

  • Build reliability in during design

    Instrumentation that promises to improve reliability may not always be what they seem. You have to consider whether a site can properly maintain sophisticated instruments.

    Dirk Willard
  • Improve control loop performance

    Specification of control valves doesn’t adequately emphasize the very basic requirement that valve position respond in a timely manner or even at all — leading to process variability.

    Gregory K. McMillan, Emerson Process Management
  • Become a cyber-security pacesetter

    Today, most plants with control systems must contend with many pressures both to allow access to data and to secure those data.

    Rick Kaun, Matrikon, Inc.
  • Monthly Preview: December 2007

    Here's a look at what will soon be featured on Be sure to check back for the latest articles, news and columns before you see it in print.

  • Diagnostics dig deeper

    Today’s plants come ready equipped with their own team of doctors in the shape of the many diagnostic and monitoring systems incorporated into instrumentation and other process equipment. And, like any good doctor, today’s plant diagnostics can look beyond the symptoms of poorly performing instruments and provide insights into the health of the process itself.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
  • Biomass fuel production gets sweeter

    Improved instrumentation and control strategies allow biofuel producers to reap the benefits of new processing techniques and advanced control strategies.

    David W. Spitzer, CONTROL Contributor
  • Achieve continuous safety improvement

    Enhancing safety performance requires diligence and unrelenting effort. The Independent Safety Review Panel’s recently released report on the safety culture and practices at BP’s U.S. refineries where a March 2005 explosion occurred in Texas City, Texas indicates similar failings are likely elsewhere in the industry. Learn what can be done to enhance continuous safety improvement.

    Angela Summers, SIS-TECH Solutions
  • Can you trust your data?

    To make sense of supply chain data requires consolidating the information into a central repository and then using tools or applications to pinpoint errors and inconsistencies. It also includes taking possible corrective actions that enhance overall quality and confidence in the raw information.

    Andrew Nelson, Matrikon Inc.
  • Don’t shackle yourself to the wrong platform

    Today, process data are readily available at many levels, from instrumentation to higher-level data historians and OPC servers. Choosing the right platform can be key to successfully implementing robust and maintainable process calculations at your company.

    Dane Overfield, Exele Information Systems
  • Keep measurements on the level

    This article looks at six technologies — mechanical floats and displacers, differential pressure, capacitance, ultrasonic, radar, and guided wave radar — that are used most often for automated control, and provides practical guidance for choosing among them.

    Jerry Boisvert, Siemens Energy & Automation
  • Implementing an operations management system

    Things are changing at warp speed. Manufacturing companies are collecting large volumes of data from data systems but improvements are possible only if the data are analyzed and developed into useful business parameters.

    Robert Wojewodka, The Lubrizol Corp.
  • Today’s China Syndrome

    The country boasts not just booming exports but a strong desire for the best technology.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
  • Process engineering: Digital data recorders deliver

    This contribution from compares mechanical, analog and digital recorders for data acquisition and concludes that local data logging can be the easiest way to satisfy regulatory requirements.

  • Process engineering: Dryer provides a concrete lesson in control

    Removing water or moisture from a liquid stream is a critical operation in many processes. Liquid stream dryers commonly contain either molecular sieves or adsorbents; during the last 20 years, the use of molecular sieves has become much more common.

    Andrew Sloley, contributing editor, and Richard Readshaw, senior staff process engineer for VECO USA Inc.
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