Articles

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  • Where is wireless going?

    Increasing interest will translate into far more monitoring applications. The worldwide market for wireless technology will grow 26% annually over the next few years, forecasts the ARC Advisory Group. Vendors are responding and key concerns are being addressed.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
    01/11/2007
  • pH sensor stands up to tough conditions

    Design provides improved reliability in a polymer-precursor batch reactor. Sensors must respond quickly and survive a harsh environment. Poor probe reliability can make the difference between a process that makes money and one that doesn’t.

    Kyle Becker, Polychemie
    01/08/2007
  • Make jacketing your strong suit

    Small details in jacketed-pipe configuration can have a big impact, according to Chemical Processing's Contributing Editor Andrew Sloley.

    Andrew Sloley, contributing editor
    12/05/2006
  • NeSSI’s success should be a lock

    The New Sampling/Sensor Initiative or NeSSI that replaces tubing, fittings and other hardware in a sampling system with miniature modular components makes sense. Enhancements now in the works should assure its success.

    Mark Rosenzweig, editor in chief
    11/29/2006
  • Data validation: Jewel in the fieldbus crown?

    Many users and most suppliers to the industry see process availability as the big payout benefit of Foundation Fieldbus (FF) diagnostics — a good portion of it realized through data validation.

    John Rezabek, Contributing Editor
    11/09/2006
  • Avoid trouble with slurries

    Handling slurries (a mix of solids and liquids), should be based on experience and experiments, not theory. Much of the knowledge obtained from pneumatic conveyors and fluidization systems can be used in understanding slurries.

    Thomas R. Blackwood, Healthsite Associates
    11/01/2006
  • Keep measurements on the level

    This article looks at six technologies — mechanical floats and displacers, differential pressure, capacitance, ultrasonic, radar, and guided wave radar — that are used most often for automated control, and provides practical guidance for choosing among them.

    Jerry Boisvert, Siemens Energy & Automation
    11/01/2006
  • Wireless devices may get a shake up

    Last month’s ISA Expo in Houston clearly showed how much attention wireless technology is attracting. However, concern about the reliability and life of batteries remains an issue. That’s why harvested or scavenged power is attracting interest.

    Mark Rosenzweig, editor in chief
    10/31/2006
  • Check for human errors

    You may be making an error if you don’t find time to double-check your own and other’s work. Making time to check human work can prevent costly mistakes and save time.

    Trevor A. Kletz, Loughborough University
    10/31/2006
  • Get answers to your biomonitoring questions

    Guidance for chemical manufacturers, processors, and distributors about Section 8(e) of the Toxic Substances control act was issued on September 14, by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Chemical Processing's Regulatory Editor Lynn Bergeson discusses the new regulation.

    Lynn Bergeson, regulatory editor
    10/24/2006
  • Industry tackles a grave issue

    End-of-life and other product stewardship initiatives will impact chemical plants. An agreement to lessen the environmental impact of chemicals production will have global ramifications. Meanwhile, European end-of-life directives on electrical and electronic equipment already are having a worldwide effect.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
    10/24/2006
  • Welcome to the Bus Wars, Part Tres

    You may not be aware, but a new bus war is being waged in your plant — the battle of the motion networks. Control Global's Senior Tech Editor Dan Hebert, PE, provides analysis and commentary on the newest battle over fieldbus.

    Dan Hebert, PE, Senior Technical Editor
    10/17/2006
  • Raising the bar for control system security

    Security researchers at Wurldtech Analytics are partnering with ISA to establish procedures and an operations model for the security testing and certification of products used for control.

    Eric and Joann Byres, principals, Wurldtech Analytics
    10/12/2006
  • Washington targets plant security

    Federal actions undoubtedly will markedly impact the chemical industry. Nevertheless, we don’t know at this point whether federal chemical security legislation will happen in 2006.

    David A. Moore and Dorothy Kellogg, AcuTech Consulting Group
    09/22/2006
  • Expect tighter particulate matter standards

    Tighter particulate matter standards are in our future, according to Regulatory Editor Lynn Bergeson in this month's Compliance Advisor column on ChemicalProcessing.com

    Lynn Bergeson, regulatory editor
    09/21/2006
  • Intellectual property issues limit university research

    Colleges must slake their thirst for royalties as intellectual property issues limit industry-backed university research, according to Chemical Processing's Editor at Large Mike Spear.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
    09/21/2006
  • Security poses an inherent industry dilemma

    Industry faces the threat of draconian demands from Congress as chemical plants remain an attractive targets for terrorism attacks, according to Mark Rosenzweig, editor in chief of Chemical Processing.

    Mark Rosenzweig, editor in chief
    09/21/2006
  • Column configuration can cripple performance

    The importance of having the inherent capability to meet operating requirements and enable proper instrumentation performance is stressed by Contributing Editor Andrew Sloley.

    Andrew Sloley, contributing editor
    09/21/2006
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