on 'Wireless Technology'

41-60 of 79 < first | | | last >
  • Wireless finds its calling

    For maintenance and condition-monitoring, wireless technology offers much more than just reducing or eliminating costs. However, wireless also requires an integrated infrastructure approach rather than independent, proprietary point solutions.

  • Plug it in?: The decision to integrate condition monitoring

    Efforts to tighten communications of condition-monitoring instrumentation and data analysis software with CMMS and automation infrastructure, combined with the proliferation of wireless sensor systems and the drive to reduce manpower skill and time requirements, are bringing implementation costs down and drawing much attention to this approach. But should you implement it?

  • What Works: Wireless PCs streamline warehouse operations

    The basic principles of Lean Manufacturing date back at least to the 18th century. In Poor Richard's Almanack, Benjamin Franklin wrote, “He that idly loses 5s. [shillings] worth of time, loses 5s., and might as prudently throw 5s. into the river. He that loses 5s not only loses that sum, but all the other advantages that might be made by turning it in dealing, which, by the time a young man becomes old, amounts to a comfortable bag of money.”

  • Gamma scanning seeks an inside edge

    Many companies decide not to build up certain capabilities in-house mainly because they don’t have sufficient regular demand for them. Gamma scanning of distillation columns is a case in point, but on-site scanning specialists may be the wave of the future.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
  • What’s in the air for continuous emissions monitoring?

    More attention to mercury and increased acceptance of predictive approaches is emerging. Such monitoring not only can keep plants on the right side of regulators but also can help provide insights for optimizing operation of equipment.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
  • Remember the basics of maintenance

    Despite the “buzz” about asset management systems don’t forget the “oilers”, advises Mike Spear, in this month's End Point column.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
  • Energy Savings Pick up Steam

    More attention to steam systems and trap monitoring provides big benefits. At most chemical plants, plant management and operators face increasing pressures to improve the energy efficiency of their processes, so they should see how they can save on steam.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
  • Where is wireless going?

    Increasing interest will translate into far more monitoring applications. The worldwide market for wireless technology will grow 26% annually over the next few years, forecasts the ARC Advisory Group. Vendors are responding and key concerns are being addressed.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
  • Wireless devices may get a shake up

    Last month’s ISA Expo in Houston clearly showed how much attention wireless technology is attracting. However, concern about the reliability and life of batteries remains an issue. That’s why harvested or scavenged power is attracting interest.

    Mark Rosenzweig, editor in chief
  • Fieldbus wars continue

    As wireless Ethernet continues its aggressive growth, end users have to wonder, “Will it replace fieldbuses?” It is clear that a battle is shaping up.

    Rich Merritt, senior technical editor
  • Cutting the wires of communications

    Users want wireless, vendors want to sell wireless, so what’s the problem? This article tackles one of the most discussed topics: the use of wireless communications in process automation.

    Walt Boyes, Editor in Chief
  • Pilot plants: destined for development

    Pilot plants are on the verge of an unprecedented evolution. Read about the 10 factors that'll impact the design, construction and operation of these next-generation units.

    Richard Palluzi, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co.
  • Small sensors promise big impact

    Because many environmental applications of nanotechnology will almost certainly revolutionize the science, law, and regulation of water pollution, readers are urged to keep abreast of this fast-changing area.

    Lynn Bergeson, regulatory editor
  • Plants smarten up

    Smart field devices can be a smart investment to better manage assets and thus boost competitiveness. These devices are increasingly being relied for analysis as well as data collection.

    C. Kenna Amos, contributing editor
  • Outsourcing moves up the maintenance ladder

    Outsourcing of non-core operations within a company, large or small, is now a well established corporate strategy. By entrusting services such as IT support, accounting, human resources and other “back office” activities to specialist firms prepared to do the job at an acceptable price, chemical companies can concentrate on their main business — where they are the specialists. That's the theory, at least.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
  • Wireless wins wider role

    Wireless is poised for a big breakthrough in plant operations because of its ease of use, safety and potential for energy savings.

    C. Kenna Amos, contributing editor
41-60 of 79 < first | | | last >