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  • NeSSI’s success should be a lock

    The New Sampling/Sensor Initiative or NeSSI that replaces tubing, fittings and other hardware in a sampling system with miniature modular components makes sense. Enhancements now in the works should assure its success.

    Mark Rosenzweig, editor in chief
  • Keep measurements on the level

    This article looks at six technologies — mechanical floats and displacers, differential pressure, capacitance, ultrasonic, radar, and guided wave radar — that are used most often for automated control, and provides practical guidance for choosing among them.

    Jerry Boisvert, Siemens Energy & Automation
  • Outsourcing innovation development

    A new development method may allow breaking away from the pack as companies continue to employ outsource facilities that offer flexibility and foster innovation.

    Chuck Kenney, Pressure Chemical Company
  • NeSSI tames the communications monster

    The new sampling/sensor initiative (NeSSI) is moving steadily to fulfill its original promise of increased efficiencies, costs-savings, and micro-analytic capabilities despite recent growing pains related to fieldbus.

    Jim Montague, Executive Editor
  • Energy savings are often disguised as problems

    Carefully managing compressed air can save money. Compressed air is often overlooked in energy studies because many people do not fully understand compressed air equipment, their own system, or what it costs to produce compressed air power.

    Scott Van Ormer and Don Van Ormer, senior application engineers, Air Power USA
  • How to select control valves, Part 1

    When it comes to selecting and sizing control valves, the non-commercial chart in this article not only helps you pick the right one for the job, but also serves as a reference tool you can download.

    Béla Lipták, PE, CONTROL Columnist
  • Choose the right temperature sensor

    There’s no simple solution to achieving accurate temperature measurement. It’s a combination of knowing the inherent accuracy of particular sensor types, and how environmental factors can create further measurement uncertainty and the sensor calibration techniques available to reduce this uncertainty.

    Cal Swanson, Watlow Electric Manufacturing Co.
  • Soft sensors win hard jobs

    Virtual instruments are gaining increasing roles — and capabilities — for closed-loop process control.

    C. Kenna Amos, contributing editor
  • pH linearization lubricates waste control

    Learn how a simplified technique for linearizing pH can enhance control in waste treatment applications and eliminate the need for gain-adjusting techniques.

  • Today’s China Syndrome

    The country boasts not just booming exports but a strong desire for the best technology.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
  • Simulated Moving Bed Chromatography Offers Real Attractions

    A continuous purification technique, simulated moving bed chromatography combines high yields and purities with easy scale up and reasonable throughputs.

    Kathleen Mihlbachler, Eli Lilly and Company, and Olivier Dapremont, Aerojet Fine Chemicals
  • Innovative corrosion monitoring solutions enhance process optimization

    Sensors now can provide data on both general and localized corrosion that allow corrosion to be treated as a real-time process variable. Using such data effectively can play an important role in optimizing plant operations.

    Dawn C Eden, David A Eden and Russell D Kane, InterCorr International, Inc., Houston, Texas
  • Process manufacturing: No transfer required

    As the pharmaceutical industry has matured, concerns about the safe handling of drug compounds during the manufacturing process have increased. To meet exposure limits and protect batches from any kind of contamination, the industry’s need for improved containment has increased.

    Diane Dierking
  • Process engineering: Dryer provides a concrete lesson in control

    Removing water or moisture from a liquid stream is a critical operation in many processes. Liquid stream dryers commonly contain either molecular sieves or adsorbents; during the last 20 years, the use of molecular sieves has become much more common.

    Andrew Sloley, contributing editor, and Richard Readshaw, senior staff process engineer for VECO USA Inc.
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