Articles

2001-2020 of 2561 < first | | | last >
  • Use leading KPIs to spot trouble

    Does your plant have reliability issues and a hard time meeting production targets? Metrics such as key performance indicators (KPIs), when identified and aligned properly, can save your plant, your job and your career. So grab a pen, open your mind and get ready to learn.

    Ricky Smith, CMRP, Contributing Editor
    09/11/2006
  • Five steps to manage Title V compliance

    Process analytics migrate to online useIf you're responsible for managing Title V at your facility, or you are in the process of securing your Title V permit, you know that the Title V operating program requires that facilities demonstrate, in one document, their compliance. A company needs more than technology to succeed at compliance.

    Greg Gasperecz, Enviance
    09/11/2006
  • Process analysis gains greater online role

    Faster. Smaller. Smarter. Modular. All express the future of process analytics. And un-stoppable describes the ongoing migration of process analytical instruments to continuous, online, field-mounted use at chemical plants.

    C. Kenna Amos, contributing editor
    09/11/2006
  • HMIs evolve in process control

    New HMI technology is putting a whole new (inter)face on how operators view control systems information, while at the same time driving human error out of systems and improving safe work practices.

    Ian Nimmo, president, User Centered Design Services LLC
    09/11/2006
  • Curriculum change isn’t enough

    Chemical engineering students deserve better teachers, according to Chemical Processing's Editor in Chief Mark Rosenzweig.

    Mark Rosenzweig, Editor in Chief
    09/11/2006
  • Remember the old reliable orifice plate

    The cost-effective dP flow meter is ideal for utility surveys, Senior Editor Dirk Willard says in this month's Chemical Processing Field Notes column.

    Dirk Willard, senior editor
    09/11/2006
  • Biomonitoring gets a going-over

    The current state of biomonitoring is detailed in the much anticipated report issued July 24 by the Committee on Human Biomonitoring for Environmental Toxicants of the National Academies, Washington, D.C.

    Lynn Bergeson, regulatory editor
    09/11/2006
  • Innovations in batching, dosing and weighing

    Challenges brought on by new regulations and technical problems for batching, dosing and weighing have pushed users to find some innovative and surprising solutions beyond our own industry.

    09/05/2006
  • The Ch in ChE stands for “Changing”

    Chemical engineers know all about the laws of supply and demand. After all, the chemical industry, which historically has employed the bulk of chemical engineers, is cyclical.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
    08/28/2006
  • Succeed at bioprocess scale-up

    While fermentation-based syntheses were once reserved for producing high-value specialty chemicals and biopharmaceuticals, bioprocess routes now are gaining increasing attention for commodity products.

    John L. Shaw, P.E., and Scott A. Rogers, P.E., CH2MHill Lockwood Greene
    08/28/2006
  • Fieldbus wars continue

    As wireless Ethernet continues its aggressive growth, end users have to wonder, “Will it replace fieldbuses?” It is clear that a battle is shaping up.

    Rich Merritt, senior technical editor
    08/23/2006
  • Energy savings are often disguised as problems

    Carefully managing compressed air can save money. Compressed air is often overlooked in energy studies because many people do not fully understand compressed air equipment, their own system, or what it costs to produce compressed air power.

    Scott Van Ormer and Don Van Ormer, senior application engineers, Air Power USA
    08/18/2006
  • Improve your approach to hazardous materials

    Committing a significant level of resources to dealing with hazardous materials can be difficult for small companies. Learn to focus on developing an accurate inventory and gain a strategic advantage.

    Jess Kraus and Michael Beckel, 3E Company
    08/18/2006
  • Twisting the dragon's tail

    Complacency is a problem when violating safety rules has no repercussions.

    Dirk Willard, senior editor
    08/18/2006
  • Can we keep pace with computers?

    The roll-out of 64-bit operating systems may necessitate taking stock of what we have.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
    08/18/2006
  • Product stewardship takes a grave turn

    European Union mandates have impacted products produced and sold in the U.S., and will ultimately affect the chemical industry, according to Editor in Chief Mark Rosenzweig.

    Mark Rosenzweig, Editor in Chief
    08/17/2006
  • Don’t Be the Hub of a Wheel

    Successful ‘green-field’ site start-ups depend on developing a team, says Senior Editor Dirk Willard.

    Dirk Willard, senior editor
    08/17/2006
  • The impact of the European Union's directives on the U.S.

    The Restrictions of the Use of Certain Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment (the RoHS Directive) is part of a growing wave of European Union product-based regulations that will profoundly impact global and United States product standards — and thus the chemical industry.

    Lynn Bergeson, regulatory editor
    08/17/2006
  • Keeping safety on the right track

    The chemical industry has, in general, an amazingly good track record on safety. Outside of those plants, however, can be another story.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
    08/17/2006
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