201-220 of 243 < first | | | last >
  • Rethink your approach to process safety

    Place more emphasis on avoiding hazards rather than just controlling them. Process risk reduction can involve limiting the likelihood of potential accidents or cutting their consequences.

    Dennis C. Hendershot, Chilworth Technology Inc.
  • 10 Tips for Success

    Paying attention to the following points can ease implementing and improving critical plant procedures:

    Patrick Kelly, Honeywell Process Solutions
  • Help Your Operators

    Automating procedures within control systems can serve to make your operators more effective and more consistent. With studies showing more than 40% of all plant incidents stemming from some form of human error, it makes sense to give automation a larger role in day-to-day operations.

    Patrick Kelly, Honeywell Process Solutions
  • Get safety under control

    Check out a different approach to safety analysis and a valuable new reference in this month's column from Editor Mark Rosenzweig.

    Mark Rosenzweig, Editor in Chief
  • Process safety is a good way to avoid bad consequences

    Process safety is an essential component of risk avoidance. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has long recognized the critically important role for process safety awareness.

    Lynn Bergeson, regulatory editor
  • Uncertain safety

    Users seeking appropriate process safety systems aren’t getting enough help from unspecific standards and ideal-world certifications. Here’s how to gain useful safety capabilities in a buyer-beware world.

  • Strike the Right Balance

    Make the walk-through your first line of defense, advises Dirk Willard in this month's Field Notes column.

    Dirk Willard, senior editor
  • Achieve continuous safety improvement

    Enhancing safety performance requires diligence and unrelenting effort. The Independent Safety Review Panel’s recently released report on the safety culture and practices at BP’s U.S. refineries where a March 2005 explosion occurred in Texas City, Texas indicates similar failings are likely elsewhere in the industry. Learn what can be done to enhance continuous safety improvement.

    Angela Summers, SIS-TECH Solutions
  • Get full value from partial stroking

    There are two main drivers for partial stroking of valves in safety systems: the desire to extend manual test intervals to as long as possible; and to reduce the amount of redundant hardware required for higher safety integrity levels. Like most things in life, it all boils down to one thing: trying to save money.

    Paul Gruhn, ICS Triplex
  • Tips and traps

    Following some partial stroke testing tips can make the process easier. Read on for more tips.

    Paul Gruhn, ICS Triplex
  • The evolution of plant automation

    Understanding the purpose of control and safety systems helps users ensure each is appropriately optimized. The duties of the SIS are to protect the people, environment and assets against unsafe conditions.

    Angela Summers, PhD, PE, founder of SIS-TECH Solutions
  • The chemical industry needs fresh eyes

    Team looking at BP’s safety failings benefited from its diverse membership. Editor Mark Rosenzweig interviews panel member Dennis Hendershot for an insider's perspective.

    Mark Rosenzweig, editor in chief
  • Twisting the dragon's tail

    Complacency is a problem when violating safety rules has no repercussions.

    Dirk Willard, senior editor
  • Keeping safety on the right track

    The chemical industry has, in general, an amazingly good track record on safety. Outside of those plants, however, can be another story.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
  • Questions about gloves link to work safety

    The proper hand protection plays a tremendous role in keeping plant workers safe. This article answers questions often posed by workers and managers about hand protection products, their applications and limitations.

    Nelson Schlatter, Ansell
201-220 of 243 < first | | | last >