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  • Powder Show Preview 2008

    The ChemProcess portion of the Process Technology for Industry International Show (PTXi) will be held from Monday through Wednesday, May 5-8, at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center, 5555 N. River Road, Rosemont, Ill.
  • Paving the Way for Bus Technology

    CONTROL's contributing editor John Rezabek says he has had great success on projects, especially upgrades and retrofits, where he was able to get an experienced board person and/or front-line supervisor assigned to the job.

  • Improve your supply chain

    A study of global chemical industry best practices provides insights on how.

    Christopher F. Lange
  • Tiny particles are drawing big interest

    Regulatory Editor Lynn Bergeson discusses how a voluntary program aims at responsible development of nanotechnology in this month's Compliance Advisor column.

    Lynn Bergeson, regulatory editor
  • What you need to know about nanotechnology

    For the first time at the Chem Show, a two-day workshop and symposium titled “Nano 101 — Nanomaterials Processing” will provide an overview of the nanomaterials industry and market, synthesis and processing issues, safe handling and use of nanostructured materials and case studies on engineered nanoparticulate material systems.

    Ken Schnepf, managing editor
  • Where is wireless going?

    Increasing interest will translate into far more monitoring applications. The worldwide market for wireless technology will grow 26% annually over the next few years, forecasts the ARC Advisory Group. Vendors are responding and key concerns are being addressed.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
  • Security poses an inherent industry dilemma

    Industry faces the threat of draconian demands from Congress as chemical plants remain an attractive targets for terrorism attacks, according to Mark Rosenzweig, editor in chief of Chemical Processing.

    Mark Rosenzweig, editor in chief
  • CAGI to verify compressor claims

    The compressed air industry is taking a step that will clear the air about the performance of its equipment. For the first time, many compressed air equipment manufacturers will submit their 50 hp to 200 hp lubricated rotary-screw compressors and 200 cfm to 1,000 cfm refrigerated air dryers to an independent laboratory for performance testing.

    Ken Byrd
  • The rise and fall of modulation

    Why have reciprocating designs fallen out of favor relative to the rotary compressor that is so predominant today? Read about the evolution of efficient controls for compressed air systems.

    Henry Kemp
  • Energy savings are often disguised as problems

    Carefully managing compressed air can save money. Compressed air is often overlooked in energy studies because many people do not fully understand compressed air equipment, their own system, or what it costs to produce compressed air power.

    Scott Van Ormer and Don Van Ormer, senior application engineers, Air Power USA
  • Can we keep pace with computers?

    The roll-out of 64-bit operating systems may necessitate taking stock of what we have.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
  • 2006 Readers' Choice Survey

    The equipment, services and suppliers selected to make a job easier greatly contribute to on-the-job success. The Readers' Choice survey identifies the leading vendors in more than 40 categories.

    Ken Schnepf, managing editor
  • Small sensors promise big impact

    Because many environmental applications of nanotechnology will almost certainly revolutionize the science, law, and regulation of water pollution, readers are urged to keep abreast of this fast-changing area.

    Lynn Bergeson, regulatory editor
  • Nanotechnology raises big concerns

    Nanotechnology is grabbing headlines these days and the growing prospects of its use is spurring increasing attention to safety issues. This article examines the worldwide reaction to burgeoning popularity of the technology and what safety concerns are legit.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
  • Develop an air-tight defense

    Chemical processors face significant challenges in controlling fugitive emissions. The emissions escape from valves, compressors, pumps, piping components, etc. It is a difficult task, but necessary to avoid penalties and other liability.

    Lynn Bergeson, regulatory editor
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