Articles

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  • Optimize pump life cycle

    Understanding an operating system reduces costs and improves reliability. Getting the most out of your pump demands a well-thought-out, holistic strategy.

    Tom Carsten and Barry Erickson, Flowserve
    04/30/2007
  • Compelling reasons to choose an insertion magnetic flow sensor

    Measuring flow rates and volumes of water and chemicals in the water, wastewater and chemical treatment industries requires the latest, simple to use and cost-effective technology that can keep up with the rigorous demands of the various applications.

    03/14/2007
  • Waylay weight woes

    Production managers, quality control managers and maintenance engineers alike have encountered weigh cells that never worked properly. Why? Why have so many switched from a supposedly high accuracy load cell solution to old fashioned level probes or sight glasses? This article touches on the worst culprits for problems and how to avoid them.

    Ryan Titmas, product manager, Sartorius North America
    01/08/2007
  • pH sensor stands up to tough conditions

    Design provides improved reliability in a polymer-precursor batch reactor. Sensors must respond quickly and survive a harsh environment. Poor probe reliability can make the difference between a process that makes money and one that doesn’t.

    Kyle Becker, Polychemie
    01/08/2007
  • pH measurement faces acid test

    Quest for more reliable readings prompts development of tougher and more-intelligent sensors. While pH control often plays a crucial role in processing, achieving reliable readings remains challenging at many sites. After all, pH sensors frequently serve in aggressive chemical environments.

    C. Kenna Amos, contributing editor
    12/05/2006
  • NeSSI’s success should be a lock

    The New Sampling/Sensor Initiative or NeSSI that replaces tubing, fittings and other hardware in a sampling system with miniature modular components makes sense. Enhancements now in the works should assure its success.

    Mark Rosenzweig, editor in chief
    11/29/2006
  • Avoid trouble with slurries

    Handling slurries (a mix of solids and liquids), should be based on experience and experiments, not theory. Much of the knowledge obtained from pneumatic conveyors and fluidization systems can be used in understanding slurries.

    Thomas R. Blackwood, Healthsite Associates
    11/01/2006
  • Keep measurements on the level

    This article looks at six technologies — mechanical floats and displacers, differential pressure, capacitance, ultrasonic, radar, and guided wave radar — that are used most often for automated control, and provides practical guidance for choosing among them.

    Jerry Boisvert, Siemens Energy & Automation
    11/01/2006
  • Boiling water is easy as one, two, three, four

    There’s more to boiler level control than measuring level and adjusting a feedwater valve. Improved measurements and inverse response are just a few of the influences on operating boilers in a reliable manner.

    David W. Spitzer
    09/15/2006
  • NeSSI tames the communications monster

    The new sampling/sensor initiative (NeSSI) is moving steadily to fulfill its original promise of increased efficiencies, costs-savings, and micro-analytic capabilities despite recent growing pains related to fieldbus.

    Jim Montague, Executive Editor
    09/15/2006
  • Innovations in batching, dosing and weighing

    Challenges brought on by new regulations and technical problems for batching, dosing and weighing have pushed users to find some innovative and surprising solutions beyond our own industry.

    09/05/2006
  • Get a handle on solids’ flow

    Properly accounting for how bulk solids actually will flow in a vessel or overall process can be crucial for successful operations. Learning some simple parameters can often provide a good sense of flowability.

    Don McGlinchey, Glasgow Caledonian University
    05/22/2006
  • Choose the right temperature sensor

    There’s no simple solution to achieving accurate temperature measurement. It’s a combination of knowing the inherent accuracy of particular sensor types, and how environmental factors can create further measurement uncertainty and the sensor calibration techniques available to reduce this uncertainty.

    Cal Swanson, Watlow Electric Manufacturing Co.
    04/24/2006
  • Keep measurements on the level

    Changes in liquid densities can throw off readings. Plants commonly rely on differential pressure (DP) cells to measure level. Read this month's Plant InSites for advice on how to solve these level problems.

    Andrew Sloley, contributing editor
    04/17/2006
  • Soft sensors win hard jobs

    Virtual instruments are gaining increasing roles — and capabilities — for closed-loop process control.

    C. Kenna Amos, contributing editor
    01/04/2006
  • Don’t let phase changes faze you

    Phase changes in the downstream processing or handling of solids cause many process problems that have inexpensive solutions.

    Tom Blackwood, Healthsite Associates LLC
    10/04/2005
  • Today’s China Syndrome

    The country boasts not just booming exports but a strong desire for the best technology.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
    09/27/2005
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