2001-2020 of 2396 < first | | | last >
  • Sasol plant benefits from reliability improvements

    Sasol Solvents reduced operating costs by more than $2 million dollars at it’s plants in Sasolburg, South Africa. The efforts earned the facility the 2005 HART Plant of the Year Award.

    Dirk Willard, senior editor
  • Heat integration steps can present control problems

    The more energy prices rise, the more heat integration saves. However, heat integration steps can present complex control problems. Slip-ups in putting control systems in place can make operations nearly impossible. That certainly was the case at one unit using heat recovery.

    Andrew Sloley, contributing editor and Carolyn K. Hawley, VECO USA
  • Fieldbus improves control system reliability

    Profibus-PA and Foundation Fieldbus both reduce cabling cost by sharing wiring among several field instruments. They also save money by reducing the number of instrument interface cards required to connect field instruments to the control system. However, they all save money by being able to use the same field transmitter for a wide range of measured variables.

    Dick Caro
  • Piping for toxic and hazardous gases

    When processes change and plants need to install any of several types of ultra-high-purity process gases, specifying an appropriate piping system is crucial. Learn about a sound system design that maximizes efficiency, purity and safety.

    Jeffrey S. Close
  • CAGI to verify compressor claims

    The compressed air industry is taking a step that will clear the air about the performance of its equipment. For the first time, many compressed air equipment manufacturers will submit their 50 hp to 200 hp lubricated rotary-screw compressors and 200 cfm to 1,000 cfm refrigerated air dryers to an independent laboratory for performance testing.

    Ken Byrd
  • Implementation fatigue

    The new market realities of higher and rising energy costs as well as global pressures to reduce fossil fuel intensity have made energy management tracking much more valuable. Learn how to keep energy productivity programs from running out of gas in Peter Garforth's latest Energy Expert column.

    Peter Garforth
  • The rise and fall of modulation

    Why have reciprocating designs fallen out of favor relative to the rotary compressor that is so predominant today? Read about the evolution of efficient controls for compressed air systems.

    Henry Kemp
  • Process analysis gains greater online role

    Faster. Smaller. Smarter. Modular. All express the future of process analytics. And un-stoppable describes the ongoing migration of process analytical instruments to continuous, online, field-mounted use at chemical plants.

    C. Kenna Amos, contributing editor
  • HMIs evolve in process control

    New HMI technology is putting a whole new (inter)face on how operators view control systems information, while at the same time driving human error out of systems and improving safe work practices.

    Ian Nimmo, president, User Centered Design Services LLC
  • Biomonitoring gets a going-over

    The current state of biomonitoring is detailed in the much anticipated report issued July 24 by the Committee on Human Biomonitoring for Environmental Toxicants of the National Academies, Washington, D.C.

    Lynn Bergeson, regulatory editor
  • Innovations in batching, dosing and weighing

    Challenges brought on by new regulations and technical problems for batching, dosing and weighing have pushed users to find some innovative and surprising solutions beyond our own industry.

  • The Ch in ChE stands for “Changing”

    Chemical engineers know all about the laws of supply and demand. After all, the chemical industry, which historically has employed the bulk of chemical engineers, is cyclical.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
  • Succeed at bioprocess scale-up

    While fermentation-based syntheses were once reserved for producing high-value specialty chemicals and biopharmaceuticals, bioprocess routes now are gaining increasing attention for commodity products.

    John L. Shaw, P.E., and Scott A. Rogers, P.E., CH2MHill Lockwood Greene
  • Energy savings are often disguised as problems

    Carefully managing compressed air can save money. Compressed air is often overlooked in energy studies because many people do not fully understand compressed air equipment, their own system, or what it costs to produce compressed air power.

    Scott Van Ormer and Don Van Ormer, senior application engineers, Air Power USA
  • Improve your approach to hazardous materials

    Committing a significant level of resources to dealing with hazardous materials can be difficult for small companies. Learn to focus on developing an accurate inventory and gain a strategic advantage.

    Jess Kraus and Michael Beckel, 3E Company
  • Twisting the dragon's tail

    Complacency is a problem when violating safety rules has no repercussions.

    Dirk Willard, senior editor
  • Don’t Be the Hub of a Wheel

    Successful ‘green-field’ site start-ups depend on developing a team, says Senior Editor Dirk Willard.

    Dirk Willard, senior editor
  • The impact of the European Union's directives on the U.S.

    The Restrictions of the Use of Certain Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment (the RoHS Directive) is part of a growing wave of European Union product-based regulations that will profoundly impact global and United States product standards — and thus the chemical industry.

    Lynn Bergeson, regulatory editor
2001-2020 of 2396 < first | | | last >