221-240 of 285 < first | | | last >
  • The rise and fall of modulation

    Why have reciprocating designs fallen out of favor relative to the rotary compressor that is so predominant today? Read about the evolution of efficient controls for compressed air systems.

    Henry Kemp
  • Fieldbus wars continue

    As wireless Ethernet continues its aggressive growth, end users have to wonder, “Will it replace fieldbuses?” It is clear that a battle is shaping up.

    Rich Merritt, senior technical editor
  • Energy savings are often disguised as problems

    Carefully managing compressed air can save money. Compressed air is often overlooked in energy studies because many people do not fully understand compressed air equipment, their own system, or what it costs to produce compressed air power.

    Scott Van Ormer and Don Van Ormer, senior application engineers, Air Power USA
  • 2006 Readers' Choice Survey

    The equipment, services and suppliers selected to make a job easier greatly contribute to on-the-job success. The Readers' Choice survey identifies the leading vendors in more than 40 categories.

    Ken Schnepf, managing editor
  • Cutting the wires of communications

    Users want wireless, vendors want to sell wireless, so what’s the problem? This article tackles one of the most discussed topics: the use of wireless communications in process automation.

    Walt Boyes, Editor in Chief
  • Control your maintenance

    Automation systems have now reached such a high degree of reliability that many personnel at plants now take them for granted. Learn to use digital communication with your asset management tools to achieve predictive maintenance and substantial savings.

    Ian Verhappen, MTL Instruments Group
  • Pilot plants: destined for development

    Pilot plants are on the verge of an unprecedented evolution. Read about the 10 factors that'll impact the design, construction and operation of these next-generation units.

    Richard Palluzi, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co.
  • Small sensors promise big impact

    Because many environmental applications of nanotechnology will almost certainly revolutionize the science, law, and regulation of water pollution, readers are urged to keep abreast of this fast-changing area.

    Lynn Bergeson, regulatory editor
  • Pumping Temperature Considerations

    "Bad actor" pumps are those pumps that have trouble with frequent and repetitive failures. In many cases, the source of the problem is an ANSI pump trying valiantly to handle a liquid well beyond the range of its design rating.of 300 degs. F.

    Ross Mackay
  • Plants smarten up

    Smart field devices can be a smart investment to better manage assets and thus boost competitiveness. These devices are increasingly being relied for analysis as well as data collection.

    C. Kenna Amos, contributing editor
  • Outsourcing moves up the maintenance ladder

    Outsourcing of non-core operations within a company, large or small, is now a well established corporate strategy. By entrusting services such as IT support, accounting, human resources and other “back office” activities to specialist firms prepared to do the job at an acceptable price, chemical companies can concentrate on their main business — where they are the specialists. That's the theory, at least.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
  • Wireless wins wider role

    Wireless is poised for a big breakthrough in plant operations because of its ease of use, safety and potential for energy savings.

    C. Kenna Amos, contributing editor
  • Oil refinery minimizes manual tank measurements

    The strategy was to enhance plant profitability, increase throughput capacity, upgrade product yields and improve on-stream reliability. Read here to find out what they accomplished.

    Sean Leonard, Matrikon
  • Who Will Manage Your Industrial Energy Costs?

    Energy cost control is not a one-time event, and it takes more than one tool to make progress. A number of people, both internal and external to an industrial facility, can contribute to effective energy management.

    Christopher Russell
  • Motives and rewards for managing plant-wide energy consumption

    What are the motives for managing energy in today’s lean competitive environment? Industry’s motives and rewards for managing their energy include plant reliability, speed, flexibility, product quality, and greater capacity to generate revenue.

    Christopher Russell
  • Feedstock change is hot and poppin’

    Corn, other renewable resources garner increasing interest and investment. Read here about the progress that is being made in discovering a new generation of feedstock.

    Bill Gerards, contributing editor
221-240 of 285 < first | | | last >