Articles

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  • Process manufacturing: No transfer required

    As the pharmaceutical industry has matured, concerns about the safe handling of drug compounds during the manufacturing process have increased. To meet exposure limits and protect batches from any kind of contamination, the industry’s need for improved containment has increased.

    Diane Dierking
    05/04/2005
  • Process engineering: Dryer provides a concrete lesson in control

    Removing water or moisture from a liquid stream is a critical operation in many processes. Liquid stream dryers commonly contain either molecular sieves or adsorbents; during the last 20 years, the use of molecular sieves has become much more common.

    Andrew Sloley, contributing editor, and Richard Readshaw, senior staff process engineer for VECO USA Inc.
    05/03/2005
  • Process Engineering: FRI meets distillation needs

    Distillation has always been a critical and costly step in the manufacture of products in the petroleum, chemical, and pharmaceutical industries. Fractionation Research reveals how companies can pool their efforts to obtain experimental distillation data.

    04/29/2005
  • 2005 Chemical Industry Salary Survey: Field of Greens

    Changing market conditions have prompted us to take a closer look at the chemical processing industry as it continues to evolve. The result is our first-ever salary survey, which has yielded some interesting insights into the workplace.

    Lisa Greenberg, managing editor
    04/12/2005
  • Process Engineering: HART – Dealing with device description

    There is a myth surrounding HART devices that you'll need a device description to communicate with a HART device. Learn why this isn't true and what you do need to know in operating a HART communication device.

    Ed T. Ladd, Jr.
    04/12/2005
  • Process engineering: Doing your level best

    Plant engineers who find it is difficult to get good level measurements have plenty of company. A recent poll shows that it is considered to be one of the two most vexing problems by process automation professionals.

    04/08/2005
  • Process Manufacturing Workforce: Don't Be Thrown for a Loop

    When processing chemicals, it has become increasingly important to isolate the process from the work environment. The agitated filter dryer accomplishes this by providing a high degree of containment.

    Ian Nimmo and John Moscatelli, User Centered Design Services LLC
    04/08/2005
  • Chemical research gets a new look

    Editor at large Nick Basta looks at what the chemical industry can do to re-invigorate its technological research. He says technology pioneered in the pharmaceutical industry promises broad benefits.

    03/11/2005
  • Process engineering: In the trenches of Fieldbus War II

    Like the 20th Century’s Great Conflict, the first Fieldbus War never really ended. But what will the outcome be this time? This article from CONTROL makes an educated prediction on how the battle may turn out.

    03/10/2005
  • Fieldbus technology: Cut through the confusion

    Fieldbus technology offers many benefits to a chemical processor if used correctly. The key is to focus on front-end design to achieve the full benefits of fieldbus technology.

    Ian Verhappen, P.Eng., ICE-Pros
    03/10/2005
  • Process Engineering: Measure problems on a higher level

    A reader has a level measurement problem with a differential pressure level transmitter. The transmitter does not track the level properly. Check out the question and the in-depth answer in this contribution from ControlGlobal.com.

    03/03/2005
  • Chemical plant site security enters the next phase

    With the last of mandated security deadlines now approaching, plants ponder future steps.  Read about all of the improvements and procedural changes that have already occurred and find out what might be next for your plant's security plan.

    Nick Basta, editor at large
    02/10/2005
  • Process Engineering: Looking for good data?

    Are you experiencing problems with measurement uncertainty and are often left with poor data? Let Dr. Gooddata help you develop objective numerical tests for good data.

    Ronald H. Dieck, Ron Dieck Associates Inc.
    02/04/2005
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