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  • The FRETT approach to pump problems

    Some U.S. oil refineries repair their centrifugal pumps every three years while other refineries enjoy an average repair interval of 10 years. Learn about the highest-performing refineries and other petrochemical companies that have significantly reduced pump failures, and how you can obtain the same results.

    Heinz P. Bloch, P.E.
  • The Ch in ChE stands for “Changing”

    Chemical engineers know all about the laws of supply and demand. After all, the chemical industry, which historically has employed the bulk of chemical engineers, is cyclical.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
  • Take the right first step to manage your energy costs

    Conducting an energy assessment provides a business plan for improvements and is the first step to managing energy costs, according to Chemical Processing's energy columnist Christopher Russell.

    Christopher Russell, energy columnist
  • Take a load off maintenance

    Use a powerful, proven technique to identify factors that impede craft efficiency.

    Timothy Finigan, Fluor
  • Support your college

    Academic laurels alone do not guarantee survival, according to Mike Spear in his monthly column.

    Mike Spear
  • Succeed at system migration

    Learn to avoid the common pitfalls that each migration option poses. Here are 10 basic migration techniques.

    Ken Keiser, Siemens Energy and Automation
  • Succeed at bioprocess scale-up

    While fermentation-based syntheses were once reserved for producing high-value specialty chemicals and biopharmaceuticals, bioprocess routes now are gaining increasing attention for commodity products.

    John L. Shaw, P.E., and Scott A. Rogers, P.E., CH2MHill Lockwood Greene
  • Spot problems with adsorbents

    The longer-than-expected life of an adsorbent points up the need to always assess the consequences of system additions. While sometimes this may involve detailed calculations, simply looking to the laws of physics can eliminate potential headaches.

    Andrew Sloley, contributing editor and Bruce Veale
  • Specifying thermal components systematically

    A common mistake made when specifying a heater or its components is not fully appreciating interactions. Taking a systems approach when specifying thermal components can help.

    Christopher C. Lanham, Watlow
  • Solve the real problem

    Sometimes solving a problem causes more harm than good

    Dirk Willard, Senior Editor
  • Small sensors promise big impact

    Because many environmental applications of nanotechnology will almost certainly revolutionize the science, law, and regulation of water pollution, readers are urged to keep abreast of this fast-changing area.

    Lynn Bergeson, regulatory editor
  • Shake up your processing lines

    Vibratory equipment plays a critical role at many plants and there are significant opportunities to upgrade this equipment.

    Linda Mioduszewski, Eriez Magnetics
  • Separations in flux

    Separation processes often account for more than 50 percent of a chemical company's operating costs. Read how membranes and other non-thermal technologies poised to win a wider role.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
  • Separation Technology: Draw Insights on Distillation

    Residue curve mapping is a powerful tool to better understand the design and operation of distillation columns. This article describes how to use residue curve maps to check the feasibility of separation of homogeneous mixtures and for developing the conceptual design of towers.

    Raymond E. Rooks, The Dow Chemical Co.
  • Security poses an inherent industry dilemma

    Industry faces the threat of draconian demands from Congress as chemical plants remain an attractive targets for terrorism attacks, according to Mark Rosenzweig, editor in chief of Chemical Processing.

    Mark Rosenzweig, editor in chief
  • Scientific Method: Rethink Experiment Design

    The traditional approach to experimentation, often referred to as the “scientific method,” requires changing only one factor at a time (OFAT), but this method only allows one to see things one dimension at a time. By varying factors only at two levels each, but simultaneously rather than one at a time, experimenters can uncover important interactions.

    Mark J. Anderson and Patrick J. Whitcomb, Stat-Ease
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