2006

New page content.
1-20 of 187 < first | prev | | last >
  • 2006 Readers' Choice Survey

    The equipment, services and suppliers selected to make a job easier greatly contribute to on-the-job success. The Readers' Choice survey identifies the leading vendors in more than 40 categories.

    Ken Schnepf, managing editor
    08/17/2006
  • Acid scavenger prevents sticky problem

    Development of ionic liquids that exhibit useful and unique properties has created huge untapped potential for commercial applications to increase operating efficiencies of many chemical production operations.

    Dr. Uwe Vagt, BASF AG and Dr. Calvin Emanuel, BASF Corp.
    06/28/2006
  • Are you certain about uncertainties?

    Dr. Gooddata, therefore, recommends that we largely abandon the term “bias.” Instead, we will use the terms “systematic error” and “systematic uncertainty.” Systematic error is the actual error that exists between a measurement and the true value with zero random errors. Systematic uncertainty is taken to mean the estimate of the systematic error’s limits that we could expect with some confidence.

    05/11/2006
  • ASM Outperforms Traditional Interface

    Forty percent of operators at a world-scale North American ethylene plant site discovered that problems were solved 40% faster using new operator interface.

    Jamie Errington, Human Centered Solutions, Dal Vernon Reising, Human Centered Solutions, and Kevin Harris, Honeywell
    03/14/2006
  • Avoid Alarm Blunders

    Ineffective alarm systems pose a serious risk to safety, the environment, and plant profitability. Too often, alarm system effectiveness is unknowingly undermined by poorly-configured alarms. Read about these 12 common mistakes that can undermine the management of your alarm system.

    Michael Marvan
    07/12/2006
  • Avoid trouble with slurries

    Handling slurries (a mix of solids and liquids), should be based on experience and experiments, not theory. Much of the knowledge obtained from pneumatic conveyors and fluidization systems can be used in understanding slurries.

    Thomas R. Blackwood, Healthsite Associates
    11/01/2006
  • Bend Pressure Drop & Heat Transfer Performance

    The presence of bends and properly predicting pressure drop through them can have a significant impact on accurately estimating the thermal and hydraulic performance of the overall unit.

    LiDong Huang / Fernando J. Aguirre
    02/16/2006
  • Better Design Is No Pipe Dream

    The benefits of using pipeline simulation tools at the piping and instrumentation diagram (P&ID) level, rather than running simulations just on the process flow diagram, can often be overlooked.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
    07/17/2006
  • Biomonitoring gets a going-over

    The current state of biomonitoring is detailed in the much anticipated report issued July 24 by the Committee on Human Biomonitoring for Environmental Toxicants of the National Academies, Washington, D.C.

    Lynn Bergeson, regulatory editor
    09/11/2006
  • Boiling water is easy as one, two, three, four

    There’s more to boiler level control than measuring level and adjusting a feedwater valve. Improved measurements and inverse response are just a few of the influences on operating boilers in a reliable manner.

    David W. Spitzer
    09/15/2006
  • BP tackles Texas City failings

    British Petroleum's tragic March 2005 explosion has been well-documented through the press. Read here to find out how that tragedy spurred the development of a new program addressing management issues at BP.

    Foster Finley and Karl Roberts, AlixPartners
    04/12/2006
  • CAGI to verify compressor claims

    The compressed air industry is taking a step that will clear the air about the performance of its equipment. For the first time, many compressed air equipment manufacturers will submit their 50 hp to 200 hp lubricated rotary-screw compressors and 200 cfm to 1,000 cfm refrigerated air dryers to an independent laboratory for performance testing.

    Ken Byrd
    09/11/2006
  • Can technologists make it to the top?

    Having a background in engineering or science means you are more likely to want an executive with the same, according to Chemical Processing's Mike Spear.

    Mike Spear, editor at large
    09/13/2006
1-20 of 187 < first | prev | | last >