Put some heat on refrigerant switchover

Addressing the eventual R22 phase-out sooner rather than later makes sense.

By Andrew Sloley, contributing editor

Share Print Related RSS
Page 3 of 3 1 | 2 | 3 Next » View on one page

1.097

1.174

1.071

Mass flow*

1.000

0.147

0.592

0.583

0.573

Compression ratio

8.65

11.95

7.55

7.30

6.98

Issues

 

Toxicity

Lubricant

Lubricant

Lubricant

 

 

 

Composition

Composition

Composition

 

 

 

Ignition

Availability

Availability

 

 

 

 

Ignition

Ignition

* Ratio to R22 system.

 



While no replacement refrigerant is ideal everywhere, each option has particular situations where it generally is preferred:

Ammonia — for systems that do not require a cooling medium below -28ºF,  have room for the vapor-handling capacity and sufficient compression ratio. Ammonia’s low molecular weight limits compression ratios available in turbocompressor-driven systems.


Propane — for systems with some extra power available and a small amount of surplus vapor-handling capacity. Lubricant separation from propane requires larger lubricant knockout drums than with R22 systems.

Propane/propylene mixtures — for systems that have excess vapor-handling capacity, can tolerate higher discharge pressures, and would benefit from cooler refrigerant temperatures. Propane/propylene mixtures have similar lubricant separation concerns as pure propane systems.

Of course, individual circumstances and other technical and economic factors will dictate actual selection. Major factors to consider include lubricant systems, safety and availability. Propane/propylene mixtures, in particular, can be difficult to get in some areas and of varying composition depending upon the supplier.

Page 3 of 3 1 | 2 | 3 Next » View on one page
Share Print Reprints Permissions

What are your comments?

You cannot post comments until you have logged in. Login Here.

Comments

No one has commented on this page yet.

RSS feed for comments on this page | RSS feed for all comments