Maintenance: Shift Your Approach to Abandoned Equipment

Leaving such items in place invariably is the worst option.

abandoned equipment hazards mn

Nearly every plant has them — equipment items abandoned in place. In better-documented facilities, such sidelined equipment still may appear on piping and instrumentation diagrams (P&IDs) with a notation like “OOS” (out of service) or “AIP” (abandoned in place). Equipment is left in place for two main reasons: money and uncertainty. Money. Taking out equipment costs time and money. Removals often must occur during the same maintenance turnaround as routine activities and plant modifications. Disconnecting and hauling away equipment could extend a turnaround’s duration, which may increase costs even more than the direct cost of the removal. However, many…

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    By Andrew Sloley, Contributing Editor

    Nearly every plant has them — equipment items abandoned in place. In better-documented facilities, such sidelined equipment still may appear on piping and instrumentation diagrams (P&IDs) with a notation like “OOS” (out of service) or “AIP” (abandoned in place). Equipment is left in…

    Full Story
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