Nanoparticles Sharpen Chemical Sensing

Near-infrared-based method overcomes limitations of current approaches

chemical sensing technique mn

A new technique can provide chemical and refractive information about compounds that can’t be measured accurately using infrared (IR) sensors, say researchers at the University of Houston (UH), Texas. Their method relies on near-infrared (NIR) light but gives far more detail than current NIR techniques, they add. The work could have a number of potential applications, including improving downhole drilling analysis in the oil and gas industry and broadening the spectrum of solar light that can be harvested and converted to electricity, explains Wei-Chuan Shih, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at UH. “Surface-enhanced near-infrared absorption…

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